Amazon says they are going to verify delivery drivers using selfies

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FILE - This Sept. 6, 2012, file photo, shows the Amazon logo in Santa Monica, Calif. Amazon’s cloud-computing service Amazon Web Services experienced problems in its eastern U.S. region, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, causing widespread problems for thousands of websites and apps. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

In a bid to combat delivery-related fraud cases, e-commerce giant Amazon is making a section of its drivers take selfies before resuming their duties for the day in order to record and verify their identities using facial recognition from time to time.

FILE – In this Nov. 13, 2018, file photo, employees walk through a lobby at Amazon’s headquarters in Seattle. Many of Amazon‚Äôs Seattle-area employees will likely be exempt from new proposed labor protections after a push by the tech giant‚Äôs lobbyists to raise the salary threshold at which the rules would kick in. The changes would partially prohibit so-called non-compete clauses, agreements widely used by tech companies and others to prohibit employees from going to work for competitors. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

For now, the requirement applies specifically to “Flex drivers” — who work as independent contractors for Amazon’s fastest “Prime” deliveries, deliver packages in their own cars and get paid $18 to $25 an hour, The Verge reported on Thursday.

By asking drivers to take selfies, Amazon could be preventing multiple people from sharing the same account which could screen out anyone who is technically unauthorised from delivering packages, such as criminals.

Prior to asking for selfies, the company notified drivers of the new requirement via the Flex app that their biometric data might be collected to confirm their identity from time to time.

Previously, the e-commerce giant has come under fire for making its factory workers meet unreasonably high quotas, forcing them to skip out on bathroom breaks and pee in bottles. Hence in contrast, requiring drivers to take selfies seems like a very small demand, the report said.

Amazon to soon deliver packages right in your garage
Amazon. (Photo: Twitter/@amazon)

Back in 2016, global ride sharing company Uber implemented a similar policy that demanded drivers to take selfies before signing into the platform and taking ride requests.

However, Uber’s plans failed to pan out as intended after reports surfaced pointing out how transgender Uber drivers were being laid off the company after taking a selfie and having it not match up to previous photos on file, due to being in different points of a gender transition.

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