Children’s Health At Risk Because Of Climate Change Warns New Public Health Initiative

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The Ontario Public Health Association (OPHA), in partnership with leading health organizations, launches Make It Better, an initiative to engage health workers and families on how they can help protect children from the harmful impacts of climate change. This is the first public health initiative in Ontario to raise public awareness about the links between climate change and children’s health, as research reveals increasingly concerning evidence.

Longer, drier and warmer summers are increasing key triggers for asthma,which is one of the leading causes of hospital admissions for children in Canada.

Between 2021 to 2050, the Toronto area could see over 30 extreme heat days annually, and over 50 extreme heat days by 20803 – and children are among the most vulnerable.

Extended, warmer seasons mean Lyme disease-carrying tick populations are growing, spreading, and active longer. Children between the ages of five and nine are particularly vulnerable to Lyme disease.

“Climate change is one of the most critical threats to human health – and children are among the most vulnerable,” says Pegeen Walsh, Executive Director at OPHA.

“As health professionals, we all have a responsibility to kids and their parents to raise awareness of these risks and give people the tools and information they need to protect their families.”

The World Health Organization describes climate change as the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century. “There are immediate steps that parents can take now to minimize climate-related health risks to their children,” says Walsh. “But ultimately we need to act on climate change. That’s the only way we can make things better for children’s health in the long run. If we don’t, these problems will certainly get worse.”

#MakeItBetter provides information about how children’s health is being impacted by climate change alongside specific tips for parents and caregivers on how to avoid these risks. The initiative also offers information and tools for people to learn more and act on climate change within their communities.

“With #MakeItBetter, we’re asking people to take a simple but incredibly meaningful pledge:  stay informed, share what they know and support action on climate change,” explains Walsh. “Being aware of these risks, and talking openly about them, is the first step.”

For more information about the initiative visit: makeitbetterontario.ca.

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