MP Wants Entire Canadian Border As ‘Port Of Entry’

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A Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer frisks a woman as she is processed before being are turned over to the Canada Border Services Agency at a tent in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec at an unofficial border station across from Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y.,. Seven days a week, 24-hours a day people from across the globe are arriving at the end of a New York backroad so they can walk across a ditch into Canada knowing they will be instantly arrested, but with the hope the Canadian government will be kinder to them than the United States. (AP File Photo/Charles Krupa)

OTTAWA: The entire Canada-U.S. border should be designated as an official port of entry to help stop the flow of illegal migrants into Canada, says Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel.

Making such a change would give the RCMP and Canada Border Services Agency more tools to deal with an ongoing influx of asylum seekers crossing the border at unofficial entry points in Quebec and Ontario, Rempel said in an interview Thursday.

“I just really feel that unless we address this issue this is going to be unending and it’s unsustainable,’’ she said. Immigration advocates have been calling on the government to suspend the Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement, which has been cited as a major factor in the spike of irregular border crossings.

The agreement prevents asylum seekers from asking for refugee protection when they present themselves at an official port of entry. They can only claim refugee status from inside Canada, which is why thousands have been crossing on foot.

If Ottawa doesn’t close that loophole, turning the entire border an official port of entry could offer an alternative solution, Rempel said. But Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale’s office was quick to shut down the idea, saying it would create even greater problems and dangers along the 9,000-kilometre border.

“It would incentivize people to cross at more remote locations and to evade detection by Canadian law enforcement so they can get to an inland immigration office and make a claim there,’’ said Goodale’s press secretary, Scott Bardsley. “That would increase the risk to Canadians and asylum seekers alike.’’

Some officials are projecting a further 400 people a day could cross the border into Quebec through forest paths this summer to claim asylum in Canada _ a situation Rempel warned will only exacerbate ongoing backlogs in the processing of refugeeclaims.

Ottawa has said it is working to ease pressures caused by the surge in asylum claims, including dedicating $74 million this year to help reduce the processing backlogs at the Immigration and Refugee Board.

But the IRB is warning concentrated surges in refugee claims and appeals could negate any gains it makes in reducing backlogs. Last year, a 20 per cent improvement in processing was swallowed by a 40 per cent increase in cases. In 2017-18, the board finalized 49,000 cases but intake over the same period increased by twice that amount, from 50,700 to 70,000 cases