Swatch defeats Apple in legal war over catch-phrase

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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2018, file photo the new Apple Watch 4 is on display at the Steve Jobs Theater during an event to announce new products in Cupertino, Calif. The latest Apple Watch, for instance, has several features that will be useful to the elderly and less-active individuals. That includes built-in EKG sensors so you can share detailed heart readings with your doctor without visiting a clinic. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Swiss watchmaker Swatch defeated Apple in a legal battle where the iPhone-maker claimed that the watch company used the phrase “One More Thing” — which was regularly used by Steve Jobs in his key notes.

While launching a “film noir inspired” set of watches in Australia, Swatch did use the phrase but it said the line was picked up from an old detective TV serial “Columbo” in which the character often said “just one more thing”, 9To5Mac reported on Saturday.

Drian Richards, the hearing officer of the case, sided with Swatch and ordered Apple to pay the watchmaker’s legal fees.

FILE- In this Sept. 12, 2018, file photo Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the new Apple Watch 4 at the Steve Jobs Theater during an event to announce new products in Cupertino, Calif. The new Apple Watch model, called Series 4, has built-in EKG sensors so you can share detailed heart readings with your doctor without visiting a clinic. Doctors get a PDF file showing the peaks and valleys of your heart rhythm, just as they would with an EKG on paper. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

He noted that Apple had never used the “One More Thing” phrase in conjunction with any “particular” goods or services.

How much will Apple have to pay back to Swatch remains undisclosed as of now.

In August, 2015 Swatch had trademarked the expression “One More Thing”.

However, Apple believed that watch-maker should not be allowed to use that trademark over the phrase and instead applied for its own trademark.

This latest ruling in Australia comes after Apple lost a similar legal battle with Swatch in Switzerland earlier in April where the watchmaker used the phrase “Tick Different” while promoting its new NFC-enabled watch.

Apple argued that the phrase unfairly traded on its “Think Different” slogan it used in the 1990s but the Swiss court sided by Swatch on the issue.

In 2007, Swatch trademarked the term “iSwatch” before Apple could register for “iWatch.”

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